Tuesday, November 26, 2019

As 'cli fi' gets hot, is the publishing industry warming up to it or does it remains cool to it?







In April 2013, NPR radio in America sounded the alarm about a hot new literary
genre dubbed "cli fi'' (thank you producer and reporter Angela Evancie), and in May 2013 the
Guardian newspaper in Britain did a follow-up (thank you Rodge Glass)
 -- followed by 'cli fi' stories in Dissent magazine's Summer 2013 issue,
the New York Yorker magazine (thank you Carolyn Kormann), New York
magazine (thank you Kathryn Schulz), the Financial Times
in London (thank you, Pilita Clark), the New York Times (thank you
Richard Perez-Pena) and the Winnipeg Free Press in Canada (thank you
Jen Zoratti).

And now as the world turns, and as the 415 ppm of carbon dioxide in the
atmosphere reaches ever upward, the publishing industry in New York,
London and Sydney remain more or less mum and tight-lipped about what
they intend to do with this trending new genre of cli-fi literature.


But in a posible series of imaginary interviews FOR NOW with people who work in the book
business in New York and London, we came across some far-seeing
imaginary but possible made up quotes.

"'If cli fi takes off the way that sci fi  did years ago, this could
be a very good publishing event for all of us," said a top literary
agent in Manhattan. "And good news, too."

"I am not sure if cli fi will work, but the term makes sense in this
age of climate fear and loathing," said an acquring editor for a major
house in Australia. "Maybe there's something here."

"I would love to see people submitting cli fi genre novels," said an
editorial director and the CEO of a major book firm in San Francisco.
"I see a
big market here and with a lot of territory to explore."

"If we want to save the world, maybe this cockamamie cli fi term might
help," said a Canadian woman who works for a top-notch green publisher
in Toronto. "I would love to see some major authors tackle the theme."


So there you have it.

Cli fi is on the march, and publishers are
following its every trending media appearance online and in print. But
when will cli fi have its own label or category on the online book
ordering site Amazon, and when will cli fi catch on to the degree that
a Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded one year in the future to the
writer of such novels is anyone's guess.

Saturday, November 23, 2019

My 15-year-old niece recently asked me if the hand-lettered #schoolstrike4climate sign that Greta Thunberg carries with her everywhere she goes, all over Sweden, all over Europe, all over the USA and Canada and Madrid, on trains and on two translatlantic sailboat trips -- everywhere, almost never lettering out of her sight -- or the sight of newspaper cameramen or TV cameras -- is a security blanket and talisman for her...

UPDATED WTH ONE ANSWER: QUESTION FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS:

My 15 year old niece recetnly asked me if the handlettered sign that Greta Thunberg carries with her everywhere she goes, all over Sweden, all over Europe, all over the USA and Canada and Madrid, on trains and on two translatlantic sailboat trips -- everywhere, almost never lettering out of her sight -- or the sight of newspaper cameramen or TV cameras --  is a security blanket and talisman for her...

SEE photo of it here:
https://thebulletin.org/2019/09/greta-thunberg-is-a-painful-reminder-of-decades-of-climate-failures/#.XfRRNDlH63Q.twitter

that carries around the world at her photo opps is maybe /perhaps /possibly a psychological or magic or what and why?

ANSWERS?

https://thebulletin.org/2019/09/greta-thunberg-is-a-painful-reminder-of-decades-of-climate-failures/#.XfRRNDlH63Q.twitter

When I posted this question on Twitter and Facebook, as a friend and admirer of Greta and not as a critic, I like her, I think she is a very interesting person, I received this answer from a practicing pychotherapist in her 70s. She told me:
''My guess would be that the handlettered sign that she carries with her everywhere, on train journeys, ocean saiIboat crossings, and which she clutches in photos almost like she's holding a cherished teddy bear, is for her andher PR team of handlers something that has become iconic, her global signature if you will -- a kind of visual reference to where and how the youth climate demonstrations started -- so I think it's not so much a 'security blanket' or a 'lucky charm' or 'talisman' but not so much for her as for the outside world (rather than for Greta's own psychological well-being.) But I'm only guessing. I have no inside direct line to Greta or her advisors, I'm afraid. 
 
However, that said, let me add this: When I think of all the people, young and old, who have been out on the streets protesting about government inaction on the climate emergency, I find it pretty amazing to think that a year ago none of this -- school strikes, Extinction Rebellion -- had even started.  So Greta must be doing something right, no? If she needs it or uses it as a security blanket or talisman to buoy up her own spirits as part of her global appeal and journey, then more power to her."

Reading the Hot New Genre of ''Cli-Fi'' in 2019 and the 2020s

Reading the Hot New Genre of ''Cli-Fi''

Rebecca Hayes

By Librarian 
Categories: Staff Picks
Short for ''Climate Change Fiction,'' cli-fi might be a relatively new term (and a play on sci-fi), but it describes a kind of story humanity has been grappling with for decades.
It’s a genre of literature that focuses on the past, present, and future effects of climate change on society.Not a subgenre of science fiction, but a unique and separate genre of its own now, cli-fi encompasses any and all literature that examines the impact of man-made global warming.
Cli-Fi selections
The term was first coined by journalist and environmentalist Dan Bloom of cli-fi.net in the early 2000s and has recently gained in popularity after being endorsed by Margaret Atwood. As a body of literature, cli-fi has been covered by The New York TimesThe Guardian, NPR, and many other outlets. The Chicago Review of Books even dedicates a monthly column penned by New Jersey literary critic Amy Brady called Burning Worlds to cli-fi book reviews, trends and author interviews.
Popular cli-fi titles include Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson, and Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer—all of which you can get in print, ebook, or eaudiobook at the Library.
Check out our new Recommendation for Adults page for a selection of cli-fi titles to try, along with other reading lists and resources.

Rebecca Hayes is the Readers Services Librarian at the Morton Grove Public Library.

Maria Kjos Fonn on cli-fi in Norway and the world at large: the power of climate fiction novels

The power of climate literature

by Norwegian novelist and journalist Maris Kjos Fonn

November 23, 2019 in the Aftenposten newspaper [COPYRIGHT 2019]

=============================================

''Tonight, this year /
in a city between all its atom /
deaths that one can call my mother,''

writes the Danish poet Theis Ørntoft.


Many people perceive the climate crisis as abstract and theoretical. But can fiction -- novels and movies and TV series -- be used to understand it better?


Australia and California have been enduring uncontrolled fires recently. In the Norwegian Arctic, k a town called Svalbard, climate warming has warned faster than anywhere else in the world. Do we also need, in addition to scientists' projections, poems novels, movies about the prospects of a world where climate becomes a man-made enemy?

  I'll admit it. The climate news about global warming scares me - to the extent that it turns sometimes into existential anxiety. While the Earth has a fever, I can wake up, overheat, and look out into the night, somewhere between all its atoms, and fear death. Then I finally manage to keep my head, as opposed to the globe, cold. I have to close my eyes. Think of something else. Sleep.

 Apocalypse now?

Yet it is not so clear outside here that I live in Oslo, Norway except perhaps from less stable winters, tropical summers and some sudden cloudbursts that cause the cows to dance. But to read about the warming is, almost chilling: the permafrost has begun to thaw at Svalbard, we are heading towards the famous tipping point that can make the huge amounts of inland ice in Greenland really start an irreversible and rapid melting process, water shortages and hunger are accelerating in the the most marginalized areas of the globe, where the least resourceful people live.

 Can we do nothing but reduce our own climate-damaging behavior, and then vote for the politicians who want to change the systems in a sustainable direction? As a reader and writer, I also ask - without it being able to save us, can fiction be used to sense and understand?

 Toxic poems

Human life conditions are changing at an extreme rate. It provides the foundation for science fiction, climate fiction and ecopoetry. Espen Stueland has written the book ''The 700-Year Flood, On Environmental Pollution and Climate Change and How Man's Relationship to Nature Shows in Politics and Poetry.
 
 "Pollution is a central trope in contemporary literature," Stueland writes, talking about a description of nature that is almost as depraved as man who considers it, poisoned, ill. He writes about the Danish poet Inger Christensen's influential work ''alphabet'', which he reads within a so-called "toxic discourse": the defoliants are found / for example dioxsin / which decompose trees / ".

 For my part, I have never had a more sensual literary experience of poisoning than when I read Ingrid Storholmen's ''Chernobyl Tales'' (published in 2009) about the nuclear accident in Chernobyl in 1986. ”You steal fruits from the trees, teeth crush against the taste buds, the grinders fuck out of the mouth cavity and sprinkled like lime out of the gap ”.

    "To forget Chernobyl is to under-communicate the risk of nuclear power," the reverse text says. At the same time, the UN Climate Panel writes that the share of nuclear power must be resolved sharply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Still, Storholmen's book is relevant beyond describing a particular historical event - it is a picture of the poisoned nature that can awaken empathy for the future environmental threat.
 Dystopias and doomsday prophecies

Stueland writes about Christensen's ''alphabet''. "If the alphabet was a less poignant, musical, and wise work, the literary critics would dismiss the author as a doomed prophet who plays on fear (as in the cli-fi and climate-horror genres)."

 But climate fiction (cli-fi) can also make useful contributions. Cli-fi's close relative sci-fi was early on to describe extreme temperature changes: such as the new ice age in Anna Kavan's Ice (in 1967), or intense heat that causes glaciers to melt and the ocean to rise in JG Ballard's The Drowned World .

 Today, climate disasters are not speculative horror. Swedish Nobel Prize winner Harry Martinson's poem Aniara (in 1956) flees the people of the Earth due to violent environmental damage: And while we rush to the safe death, in a space that lacks land and coasts (…) within the last moment that all humans / eventually should meeting wherever they found a party.

 Science fiction with a journey into space can also be found in Tarjei Vesaas-nominated Maria Dorothea Schrattenholz's collection of poems Atlaspunkt. The collection is a journey from the beginning of humankind in the Stone Age, and beyond agriculture, until we find ourselves on Mars, the only place left where the climate is hospitable. The poet self is looking down on Earth:
 
you are covered in earth, ash, dust /
they say I come from you /
but I have never touched you /
forgot your gravity.

 And then, like an echo of Theis Ørntoft:
 
I needed a reason for my grief /
so I killed my mother.

When the poems melt

Is there anything at all about writing, or reading, fiction about climate? Norwegian Agnar Lirhus writes in the preface to the book ''What Was She Saying,'' a drawn poem, illustrated by Rune Markhus, which is close to Christensen's alphabet: "We read poems that blend with the world".

  Put at the forefront, with the extremely demanding political solutions required to curb mass destruction in a Domino effect, can poets be used for anything, besides the art having an aesthetic value in itself?
 
Does it have political impact? I say yes.
 
As several climate psychologists have pointed out, it is not that we are not aware of the seriousness of the climate crisis. But numbers and news become abstract, far away, too big. Fiction can create a closeness and empathy that graphs and newspaper articles cannot. It does not mean that a poem can change the world - it cannot. But it can be one of many expressions that contribute to changes in attitudes and behavior.

 As Anne Helene Guddal writes in her ollection of poems ''There is also the irreconcilable'' from 2014, which admittedly is about mental, not ecological, collapse:
 
Can art save lives? /
Hardly / - but it tries /
whether you want to or not.

Friday, November 22, 2019

''Jewish Cli-Fi? Who knew?''


'Lamed Vav.' [Google It.]

 Steven Pressfield’s new potboiler climate thriller Jewish cli-fi novel titled "36 Righteous Men" is reviewed by Adam Hirsch here -- [''Jewish CliFi#? Who knew?''] - Read the whole here:

https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/294315/lamed-vav-google-it

‘Lamed Vav.’ Google It.

Finally, a potboiler religious action-thriller cli-fi novel built around an ancient Jewish mystery, in Steven Pressfield’s ‘36 Righteous Men’

November 22, 2019
 
Christian writers have long since woken up to the crowd-pleasing potential of the religious action-thriller.

The popular Left Behind series, by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins, spun 16 novels out of the Book of Revelation, narrating the Rapture, the coming of the Antichrist, and the war of Armageddon.

Dan Brown sold 80 million copies of The Da Vinci Code by imagining a millennia-old Vatican conspiracy involving the Holy Grail and the true identity of Mary Magdalene.

So what do Jewish readers have to compete with that?

A handful of arty novels about golems.

Surely we deserve at least one book where the hero unravels an ancient Jewish mystery and staves off the end of the world by shooting an RPG at the devil to knock him back through the portals of Gehenna? Right?

Well, now we have one, thanks to Steven Pressfield’s 36 Righteous Men.

Like Tom Clancy, Pressfield—a 76-year-old ex-Marine who published his first novel, The Legend of Bagger Vance, when he was in his 50s—writes fast-paced, stripped-down prose that is regularly interrupted by lovingly technical descriptions of computers, cars, and weaponry.

One episode in the novel, where the good guys enter an IDF armory to select the guns they will use to fight the bad guy, evokes the opening of countless shoot-’em-up video games.

But the genre to which 36 Righteous Men really belongs is the movies. The hero, Manning, is a tight-lipped but deep-souled cop with a tragic past who could be played by Bruce Willis. The narrator is his partner, Dewey, a kick-ass babe who evokes Lara Croft as played by Angelina Jolie. Most of the scenes follow a Hollywood template: the car chase, the police interrogation, the shootout. Pressfield even sets out the dialogue in script format:

MANNING
You okay, Dewey?

ME
I’m cool.

MANNING
Don’t fuck around.

ME
I’m cool.
Yet this must be the only book of its kind that includes a key scene at the Dorot Jewish Division of the New York Public Library on 42nd Street. That is where Manning goes to start unraveling the strange case he is assigned to: a series of murders where the victims are found choked to death with seemingly inhuman force, and with the letters “LV” stamped into the flesh between their eyes. Manning is at a loss until he receives an anonymous text: “LV is Hebrew. The letters ‘lamed’ and ‘vav.’ Google it.”

Why Pressfield didn’t simply have the victims imprinted with the actual Hebrew letters, rather than English transliterations, is never explained. (It’s all the more bothersome since we hear that similar victims are being found around the world, particularly in Russia.

Why would they have English letters on their foreheads? Or did they have the Cyrillic equivalents?)

But a Jewish reader familiar with the term lamed-vavnik will understand the meaning of the clue.

In Hebrew, the numerical value of the letters is 36, and they refer to the legend Pressfield uses for his title: the idea that in each generation, there are 36 perfectly just men, the lamed-vavniks, on whose merit the existence of the world depends. (In fact, the name of the first victim is Michael Justman.)

This idea dates back to the Talmud: In a passage of messianic speculation in Tractate Sanhedrin, the rabbis say that “the world has no fewer than 36 righteous people [tzadikim] in each generation who greet the Divine Presence.” The catch is that no one knows who these people are: That’s why they are called tzadikim nistarim, the “hidden righteous ones.” Even the tzadikim themselves, in some tellings, don’t know that they belong to the group.

Taken as a spiritual allegory, this is a beautiful and profound idea, suggesting that goodness is inward, inconspicuous, and that the people God loves most are never those whom the world bows down to.

But Pressfield—like a few other novelists before him—takes the legend in a more conspiratorial direction. Someone, it seems, is hunting down the 36 tzadikim and killing them one by one. (In this 21st-century telling, they include women as well as men, but it’s not clear whether they are all Jews. The ones we hear about by name are, but there are references to Chinese and Latin American victims as well.) The forensic evidence shows that the killer can float through windows and is invisible to security cameras; clearly, Manning and Dewey aren’t dealing with an ordinary suspect. And as they learn more about the legend of the tzadikim nistarim, they start to realize that the real goal of the killer is to bring about the end of the world, by eliminating the righteous individuals on whom Creation is supposed to rest.

Readers in academia will be tickled to discover that it turns out the person responsible for all this destruction in the novel's story is, terrifyingly, “an associate professor at Columbia in Judaic studies.”

This is Jake Instancer, who introduces himself to Manning at the Dorot Library and explains the legend of the lamed-vavniks. But it soon turns out that there is more to this nondescript professor (“tall, clean-shaven, athletic—dressed in jeans, T-shirt, and hoodie”) than meets the eye. Soon after their meeting, Instancer takes Manning to Brooklyn for a farbrengen (another first for this genre) with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, which goes horribly wrong when the rebbe ends up getting murdered like the other LV victims. It turns out that Instancer is the killer Manning was looking for all along.
But wait, you ask—how can there be a Lubavitcher Rebbe? Hasn’t that position been vacant since the death of the seventh rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneersohn, in 1994? Yes, but 36 Righteous Men takes place in the year 2034, and apparently “the Council of Elders appointed an eighth Rebbe in 2024—a renowned scholar of the same ancient line.” And it’s not just Chabad that has changed a lot in the next 15 years. The most original element in 36 Righteous Men is Pressfield’s evocation of a dystopian world wrecked by global warming. As Manning and Dewey pursue their suspect from New York to Israel, we see signs of disaster everywhere: temperatures always above 100 degrees, water shortages leading to riots and wars. (One happy side effect is that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is over: Everyone has to band together to fight against the elements.)

It’s often been observed that environmentalism serves many secular people today as a substitute for religion. But this has seldom been more explicit than it is in 36 Righteous Men. For what, in the year 2034, is a righteous person? It turns out that all of the LV victims are, in one way or another, fighting against climate change; and the end of the world that Instancer wants to bring about will take the form of our own destruction of the planet. Goodness is no longer a religious concept but an ecological one.

Yet at the same time, the genre in which Pressfield is working demands that the denouement involve explosions, not carbon-sequestering pilot demonstrations. And so 36 Righteous Men tries to have it both ways. Manning and Dewey, equipped with shoulder-launched missiles and giant “Zombie Killer” shotguns, do battle with Instancer in Megiddo, the Israeli site of the biblical Armageddon; in doing so, they hope to protect the last lamed-vavnik, a climate scientist whose inventions will help stave off global warming.

Will they succeed?

It wouldn’t be very righteous of me to give away the ending.
***






 
 



HOUSE ON FIRE -- forthcoming essay anthology about climate change –– with a great slate of writers –– co-edited by Tajja Isen and Amy Brady: PUB DATE: TBA


''HOUSE ON FIRE''

is 

an upcoming essay anthology about climate change –– with a great slate of invited writers –– and co-edited by two top literary editors Amy Brady (video) and Tajja Isen.

Emily Temple, senior editor at LitHub tells us on November 20:

Editor in Chief of Chicago Review of Books and cli-fi expert Amy Brady and contributing editor at Catapult Magazine Tajja Isen will be editing an anthology of essays entitled House on Fire: Dispatches from a Climate-Changed World. Contributors include Jeff VanderMeer, Lidia Yuknavitch, Porochista Khakpour, Gregory Pardlo, Lacy Johnson, and others, with a focus on “where and how they’ve witnessed climate change in their own lives, neighborhoods, workplaces, and families, connecting the personal to the planetary.”

Agented by Rahane Sanders

Publisher: Catapult
 
Acquiring Editor: Leigh Newman at Catapult

PUBLICATION DATE: to be announced

Authors in the anthology include:

Lacy Johnson
Porochista Khakpour
Lidia Yukanovitch
Jeff Vandermeer (JVM)
and dozens more


The children's book industry in India has largely evolved over the past decade — not only is literature available in more regional languages in India but there is also an expansion in genres, such as ''climate-fiction,'' also known as ''cli-fi'' and coined by American journalist Dan Bloom in 2011.

The children's book industry in India has largely evolved over the past decade — not only is literature available in more regional languages in India but there is also an expansion in genres, such as ''climate-fiction,'' also known as ''cli-fi'' and coined by American journalist Dan Bloom in 2011.

Put together by the German Book Office New Delhi, the central contact for the German and Indian book industry, JUMPSTART facilitates an exchange between experts and creative professionals.

The theme of the festival for its 10th edition that kicks off this weekend is Beyond the Book. First up, Neeraj Jain, MD, Scholastic India will give an overview of the Indian landscape of children's literature, while storytelling community Wattpad India's country head Devashish Dharma will discuss the importance of digital platforms. The event also delves into adaptations with a panel featuring author of Bard of Blood Bilal Siddiqi and Story Ink's Sidharth Jain. Animator Shilpa Ranade and award-winning author Paro Anand will also conduct masterclasses for writers and illustrators.

For the first time, the festival includes a primer on author branding and pro­m­­otion. The session will feature di­gital marketer and author Venke Sh­­arma with literary agent Mita Kapur of Siyahi and will be moderated by As­ad Lalljee. Talking about common mistakes aut­h­­ors make on social media, Sharma says, "Some often choose the wrong platform; if you're going to talk about your personal life on Facebook, then the relevance of your book is lost, unless your personal brand is as good as the content you're producing." Kapoor shares an important tip for those who wish to approach a literary agent. "Don't write to an agent and to publishers simultaneously. Do your research — follow the submission guidelines and write a cover note," she suggests.

“For the last year I have made every decision looking at my bento.” - Yancey Strickler, New Age Seer

YANCEY  STRICKLER . paints a picture of a healthier approach to capitalism... a very different picture of how our economy can better serve all of us, not just that “party in the back”.

He’s coined it “Bentoism”.

HE SAYS IN NEW AGEY WAY:

“For the last year I have made every decision looking at my bento.” -- Yancey Strickler, New Age Seer


What if this New Agey Japanesey spinoff of so-called #bentosim  is just another hip business piece of well-written hot air, but in the end hot air?

''Hara Hachi Bu?'' Japanese people today don't buy into that at all.

Beyond Near-Term Orientation ?

Cute #initialism, but Yancey, please, NO!

What's next: ''Secret Kimono'' ?

=================

''This Could Be Our Future: A Manifesto for a More Generous World'' Kindle Edition

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Imagination's role in the fight against climate change uses ''cli-fi'' as a rising new genre

Imagination's role in the fight against climate change uses ''cli-fi'' as a rising new genre

Experts at ASU say imagination is what’s lacking in the race to combat climate change but that ''cli-fi'' may hold the key
 
"This ability to visualize new ideas is what experts at ASU say is crucial for our future on this planet."
 
The environmental structures that allow Earth to sustain life — glaciers, oceans, rainforests — are quickly deteriorating at a rate not seen since the last mass extinction that killed 76% of all species on Earth.

Since 1900, nearly 500 species of animals have gone extinct, and the further destruction of ecosystems only brings us closer to seeing homo sapiens added to the list.

The U.N. climate change executive secretary, Patricia Espinosa, estimates that we only have 11 years before we reach a point of no return with our carbon dioxide emissions. The biggest challenge of this generation, and the next century, will be our ability to mitigate the effects of climate change.

The Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU is taking an eccentric approach to finding solutions to climate change. Their Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative uses works of climate fiction -- aka ''cli-fi' and coined in 2011 by longtime friend of ASU Dan Bloom to place mental images of the effects of climate change in the minds of their readers.

Klaus Lackner, director of the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions, said because people can’t visualize the effects they have on the environment, they aren’t acting on solutions that could help save it.

Lackner said he recently handed people bags full of sand meant to represent the carbon emissions coming out of their vehicles by the mile. By handing them an object they could see and feel, the people were able to visualize the immediate impact their cars are having on the environment.
Movies or science fiction pieces [or cli-fi novels] can help people imagine these solutions and play a crucial role in combating climate change by inspiring the populace to imagine new solutions. They also visualize what might happen in the future.

For example, “Star Trek” inspired Martin Cooper to invent the first mobile phone.

This ability to visualize new ideas is what experts at ASU say is crucial for our future on this planet.

The cli-fi initiative at ASU was set up in 2014 to not only imagine new solutions, but to also open the discussion about climate change to the general public and their role in combating it.

As the current editor and program manager for the Center for Science and the Imagination, Joey Eschrich said imagination is something everybody possesses.

“It's not as if some people are born incredibly imaginative and the rest of us are born with very little imagination. It's more like some people are encouraged to embrace and develop their imagination and be expansive ... And then some people are not encouraged that way … especially when they're young,” Eschrich said.

“When you get into a career or a profession … you're encouraged to not necessarily question how things are working and exercise your critical faculties as much.”

In addition, he said that another part of what stagnates imagination is the way society prioritizes short-term thinking and the pursuit of goals that can be measured.

Eschrich is carrying on the program's legacy. His role at the center is to work with cli-fi authors and, “create visions of the future that are not only inspiring and inclusive, but also grounded in real science and technology.”

The initiative currently has a bi-annual publication of cli-fi short stories called “Everything Change." The title comes from a quote by Margaret Atwood, “I think calling it 'climate change' is rather limiting, I’d rather call it 'the everything change.'”

One of the goals of the initiative is to invite people from all over the world to submit fictional cli-fi stories about how they imagine climate change will impact our future.

“Hopefully, literature is a way to kind of see and help people feel more enfranchised and invite them into the conversation,” Eschrich said.

Leah Newsom, the outreach coordinator for the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, wrote the cli-fi story “Orphan Bird” which was  published in the second edition of “Everything Change.”

READ MORE: Student's climate fiction story looks at environmental issues through a human lens

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Cli-fi novels in 2019 in RUSSIA ! An essay in Russian (translated to English here) by Dr Artem Goncharenko

in RUSSIA ! A term coined in America by literary blogger Dan Bloom. A literary essay here by Russian cli-fi expert Dr Goncharenko here below in translation via free site DeepL.com

https://habr.com/ru/company/cloud4y/blog/475314/

LINK: Dr. Artem Goncharenko . writes from Russia:

Cli-Fi is rising worldwide! This cli-fi is WOW; everyone will find something.

 

Экофантастика на защите планеты
         

Cli-fi novels and movies worldwide about protecting our Earth for all people!
         


Cli-Fi (climate fiction, a subgenre of Sci-Fi, science fiction) began to be talked about in 2013 when NPR radio in the USA did a major broadcast about it on April 20, 2013, although fantastic works affecting the environment have been published before. Cli-Fi is a very interesting genre of science fiction, which is based on theoretically possible or already existing technologies and scientific achievements of mankind, which can dramatically spoil our lives. In ecofantastics, the problems of people's connivance with nature and other people are raised.
You will ask how the ecology and Cloud4Y are connected? Well, first of all, the use of cloud technologies helps to reduce emissions of harmful substances into the atmosphere. That is, environmental care is there. And secondly, it is not a sin to talk about interesting literature.
Reasons for Cli-Fi's popularity
Cli-Fi literature is popular. Seriously, the same Amazon even devoted a whole section to it. And for good reason.
-The first one is panic. We are moving into a future that is difficult to predict. It's hard because we're influencing it ourselves. Global carbon dioxide emissions have reached record levels, the past four years have seen an abnormally high average temperature (even in Africa, winter is 3°C warmer), coral reefs are dying and the ocean is rising. The climate is changing, and this is a signal that something could be done to change the situation. And to get a better understanding of the issue and to know the possible options, you can read the climate fiction.
-The second is generational. Young people are actively thinking about the importance of respect for nature. Their voice is increasingly heard in the media, and this is good, it should be supported. And it is not about letting the now-fashionable eco-activist Greta Tunberg in the stands more often, where she can blame everything and everything violently. It is more useful for young people to read about the next project of Bojan Slat, which offers real methods to protect the environment. After getting his enthusiasm, the young generation begins to study the issue in detail, reads books (including Cli-Fi) and draws conclusions.
-Three, psychological. The peculiarity of climate fiction is that the writer can not condense the colors, painting a bleak future. Fear of nature and anticipation of the possible consequences for the destructive impact on it so long ago sits in people that it is enough just a little fingernail podgle it. Cli-Fi uses our sense of guilt, causing a desire to read possible scenarios of future cataclysms. Postapocalyptics is in fashion now, and Cli-Fi uses it.

Is it good? I guess so. This kind of literature allows us to draw people's attention to issues and problems they haven't even thought about. No statistic calculations of scientists are as effective as a good book. The authors come up with different stories, create amazing worlds, but the key question remains: "What is waiting for us in the future, if we do not find the strength to weaken its devastating impact on the planet?
Which books are worth paying attention to? Let's talk about it now.

What to read
 Trilogy of Margaret Attwood (Orix and Korostel - Year of the Flood - The Mad Addam). The author shows us the life of the Earth after the death of the ecosystem. The reader finds himself in a devastated world where, it seems, only one person who struggles for survival survived. The story that Atwood tells is realistic, scary and instructive. In the course of the story, the reader may notice the details hinting at modern realities - deteriorating ecology, corruption of politicians, greediness of corporations and short-sightedness of ordinary people. These are just hints of how human history can end. But these hints scare us.
Lauren Groff and her collection of short stories "Florida" are also worth your attention. The book is invisibly, covertly and imperceptibly about the environment, and the thought of the importance of taking care of the environment arises only after reading sometimes difficult and restless stories about snakes, storms and children.

The novel "Flight Behavior" by the American writer Barbara Kingsolver makes the reader empathize with the stories about the impact of global warming on monarch butterflies. Although the book seems to be about familiar to many people difficulties in life in the family and at home.
"Paolo Bacigalupi's Water Knife shows a world in which sudden global climate change has made water a tradable commodity. Water scarcity forces some politicians to start their own games, sharing a sphere of influence. Sectarians are gaining ground, and a young and very jovial journalist is looking for trouble in the soft places, trying to understand the water distribution system.
Eric Brown's novel Sentinel Phoenix has a similar idea. Nature has struck back at mankind. There is a great sushi on Earth. Few survivors are fighting for water sources. A small team goes to Africa in the hope of finding such a source. Will their search be successful and what will the road teach them? You will find the answer in the book.
 
О Cli-Fi (climate fiction, производная от Sci-Fi, science fiction) предметно стали говорить в 2007 году, хотя фантастические произведения, затрагивающие вопросы экологии, публиковались и раньше. Cli-Fi — это весьма интересный поджанр научной фантастики, который базируется на теоретически возможных или уже существующих технологиях и научных достижениях человечества, которые могут кардинально испортить нашу жизнь. В экофантастике поднимаются проблемы попустительского отношения человека к природе и другим людям.

Вы спросите, как связаны экология и облачный провайдер Cloud4Y? Ну, во-первых, использование облачных технологий позволяет сократить выбросы в атмосферу вредных веществ. То есть забота об экологии присутствует. А во-вторых, про интересную литературу и рассказать не грех.

Причины популярности Cli-Fi


Cli-Fi литература популярна. Серьёзно, тот же Amazon даже целый раздел ей посвятил. И на то есть причины.

  • Первая, паническая. Мы движемся в будущее, которое трудно спрогнозировать. Трудно, потому что мы сами на него влияем. Мировые выбросы углекислого газа достигли рекордного уровня, последние четыре года наблюдается аномально высокая средняя температура (даже зима в Африке стала на 3°C теплее), коралловые рифы погибают, а уровень океана повышается. Климат меняется, и это является сигналом о том, что неплохо было бы что-то предпринять для изменения ситуации. А чтобы лучше разбираться в вопросе и знать возможные варианты развития событий, можно почитать климатическую фантастику.
  • Вторая, поколенческая. Молодёжь активно задумывается о важности бережного отношения к природе. Её голос всё чаще слышен в СМИ, и это хорошо, это надо поддерживать. И речь не о том, чтобы почаще пускать модную нынче эко-активисту Грету Тунберг к трибуне, где она может яростно обличать всё и вся. Для молодёжи полезнее читать про очередной проект Бояна Слата, предлагающего реальные методы по защите окружающей среды. Заразившись его энтузиазмом, юное поколение начинает изучать вопрос детальнее, читает книги (в т.ч. Cli-Fi), делает выводы.
  • Третья, психологическая. Особенность climate fiction заключается в том, что писателю можно и не сгущать краски, расписывая безрадостное будущее. Cтрах перед природой и ожидание возможных последствий за губительное влияние на неё так давно сидит в людях, что достаточно лишь немного поддеть его ногтем. Cli-Fi использует наше чувство вины, вызывая желание читать возможные сценарии будущих катаклизмов. Постапокалиптика сейчас в моде, и Cli-Fi этим пользуется.

Хорошо ли это? Пожалуй, да. Подобная литература позволяет привлечь внимание людей к тем вопросам и проблемам, о которых они даже не думал. Никакие статистические выкладки учёных не способны действовать так же эффективно, как хорошая книжка. Авторы придумывают разные сюжеты, создают удивительные миры, но ключевой вопрос остаётся неизменным: «Что нас ожидает в будущем, если мы не найдём в себе силы ослабить своё разрушительное влияние на планету?».

На какие же книги стоит обратить внимание? Сейчас расскажем.

Что почитать


Трилогия Маргарет Этвуд («Орикс и Коростель» — «Год потопа» — «Беззумный Аддам»). Автор показывает нам жизнь Земли после гибели экосистемы. Читатель оказывается в опустошенном мире, где, кажется, остался в живых лишь один человек, с трудом борющийся за выживание. История, которую рассказывает Этвуд, реалистична, страшна и поучительна. Читатель по ходу повествования может заметить детали, намекающие на современные реалии — ухудшающуюся экологию, коррупцию политиков, жадность корпораций и недальновидность обычных людей. Это всего лишь намёки на то, чем может закончиться история человечества. Но намёки эти пугают.

Лорен Грофф и её сборник коротких рассказов «Флорида» тоже достойны вашего внимания. Книга незаметно, исподволь затрагивает тему экологии, а мысль важности заботы об окружающей среде возникает только после прочтения подчас тяжёлых и беспокойных историй о змеях, штормах и детях.

Роман американской писательницы Барбары Кингсолвер «Настроение полёта» (Flight Behavior) заставляет читателя сопереживать истории о влиянии глобального потепления на бабочек-монархов. Хотя речь в книге, казалось бы, идёт про знакомые многим жизненные трудности в семье и в быту.

«Водяной нож» Паоло Бачигалупи показывает мир, в котором внезапные глобальные климатические изменения привели к тому, что водные ресурсы стали ходовым товаром. Дефицит воды заставляет некоторых политиков начать свои игры, деля сферы влияния. Сектанты набирают всё больший вес, а юная и очень бойкая журналистка ищет неприятности на особо мягкие места, пытаясь разобраться в системе водораспределения.

Схожая идея и у романа Эрика Брауна «Часовые Феникса». Природа нанесла человечеству ответный удар. На Земле стоит великая сушь. Немногие выжившие сражаются за источники воды. Небольшая команда отправляется в Африку в надежде найти такой источник. Будут ли их поиски удачными и чему научит дорога? Ответ вы найдёте в книге.

Раз речь зашла о дороге, хочу дополнительно упомянуть книгу, которая произвела на меня сильное впечатление. Она так и называется, «Дорога», автор — Кормак Маккарти. Это не совсем Cli-Fi, хотя экологическая катастрофа и сопутствующие ей проблемы присутствуют в полной мере. Отец с сыном идут к морю. Идут, чтобы выжить. Верить нельзя никому, слишком озлоблены оставшиеся в живых люди. Но остаётся луч надежды, что порядочность и честность по-прежнему живы. Надо только найти их. Получится ли?

Если вас интересует, как экологическая катастрофа может привести к классовыми и расовым вопросам, то можно прочесть книгу доминиканской писательницы Риты Индианы «Щупальца» (Tentacle). Не самый простой, и подчас навязчиво толерантный роман (если что, я вас предупредил) рассказывает о недалёком будущем, где молодая горничная оказалась в центре пророчества: только она может путешествовать во времени и спасти океан и человечество от катастрофы. Но сначала она должна стать человеком, которым она всегда была — с помощью священного анемона. Близок по духу книге и короткометражный фильм «Белый» Сайеды Кларк, в котором ради благополучного рождения своего ребёнка молодой человек жертвует… свой собственный цвет кожи.

«Шансы на завтра» (Odds Against Tomorrow) Натаниэля Рича описывают жизнь молодого специалиста, который погружается в математику катастроф. Он делает расчёты наихудшего развития событий экологических коллапсов, военных игр, стихийных бедствий. Его сценарии предельно точны и подробны, а потому задорого продаются корпорациям, так как позволяют защитить их от любых будущих бедствий. Однажды он узнаёт, что наихудший сценарий вот-вот настигнет Манхэттен. Молодой человек понимает, что он может разбогатеть на этом знании. Но какой ценой достанется ему это богатство?

Кима Стэнли Робинсона порой называют гением научной фантастики, помешанным на климатических изменениях. Его серия из трёх самостоятельных книг под названием «Столичная наука» объединена проблемой экологических катастроф и глобального потепления планеты. Действие разворачивается в недалёком будущем, когда глобальное потепление приводит к массированному таянию льдов и изменению течения Гольфстрима, что грозит наступлением нового Ледникового Периода. Некоторые люди борются за будущее человечества, однако немало есть и тех, кого даже на пороге гибели цивилизации волнуют лишь деньги и власть.
A terme coined by Dan Bloom in 2011 at cli-fi.net
A long literary essay by Dr Artem Goncharenko in Russian here and in English below: SCROLL DOWN for Enlgish or read here:
 
 
Экофантастика на защите планеты
         

О Cli-Fi (climate fiction, производная от Sci-Fi, science fiction) предметно стали говорить в 2007 году, хотя фантастические произведения, затрагивающие вопросы экологии, публиковались и раньше. Cli-Fi — это весьма интересный поджанр научной фантастики, который базируется на теоретически возможных или уже существующих технологиях и научных достижениях человечества, которые могут кардинально испортить нашу жизнь. В экофантастике поднимаются проблемы попустительского отношения человека к природе и другим людям.

Вы спросите, как связаны экология и облачный провайдер Cloud4Y? Ну, во-первых, использование облачных технологий позволяет сократить выбросы в атмосферу вредных веществ. То есть забота об экологии присутствует. А во-вторых, про интересную литературу и рассказать не грех.

Причины популярности Cli-Fi


Cli-Fi литература популярна. Серьёзно, тот же Amazon даже целый раздел ей посвятил. И на то есть причины.

  • Первая, паническая. Мы движемся в будущее, которое трудно спрогнозировать. Трудно, потому что мы сами на него влияем. Мировые выбросы углекислого газа достигли рекордного уровня, последние четыре года наблюдается аномально высокая средняя температура (даже зима в Африке стала на 3°C теплее), коралловые рифы погибают, а уровень океана повышается. Климат меняется, и это является сигналом о том, что неплохо было бы что-то предпринять для изменения ситуации. А чтобы лучше разбираться в вопросе и знать возможные варианты развития событий, можно почитать климатическую фантастику.
  • Вторая, поколенческая. Молодёжь активно задумывается о важности бережного отношения к природе. Её голос всё чаще слышен в СМИ, и это хорошо, это надо поддерживать. И речь не о том, чтобы почаще пускать модную нынче эко-активисту Грету Тунберг к трибуне, где она может яростно обличать всё и вся. Для молодёжи полезнее читать про очередной проект Бояна Слата, предлагающего реальные методы по защите окружающей среды. Заразившись его энтузиазмом, юное поколение начинает изучать вопрос детальнее, читает книги (в т.ч. Cli-Fi), делает выводы.
  • Третья, психологическая. Особенность climate fiction заключается в том, что писателю можно и не сгущать краски, расписывая безрадостное будущее. Cтрах перед природой и ожидание возможных последствий за губительное влияние на неё так давно сидит в людях, что достаточно лишь немного поддеть его ногтем. Cli-Fi использует наше чувство вины, вызывая желание читать возможные сценарии будущих катаклизмов. Постапокалиптика сейчас в моде, и Cli-Fi этим пользуется.

Хорошо ли это? Пожалуй, да. Подобная литература позволяет привлечь внимание людей к тем вопросам и проблемам, о которых они даже не думал. Никакие статистические выкладки учёных не способны действовать так же эффективно, как хорошая книжка. Авторы придумывают разные сюжеты, создают удивительные миры, но ключевой вопрос остаётся неизменным: «Что нас ожидает в будущем, если мы не найдём в себе силы ослабить своё разрушительное влияние на планету?».

На какие же книги стоит обратить внимание? Сейчас расскажем.

Что почитать


Трилогия Маргарет Этвуд («Орикс и Коростель» — «Год потопа» — «Беззумный Аддам»). Автор показывает нам жизнь Земли после гибели экосистемы. Читатель оказывается в опустошенном мире, где, кажется, остался в живых лишь один человек, с трудом борющийся за выживание. История, которую рассказывает Этвуд, реалистична, страшна и поучительна. Читатель по ходу повествования может заметить детали, намекающие на современные реалии — ухудшающуюся экологию, коррупцию политиков, жадность корпораций и недальновидность обычных людей. Это всего лишь намёки на то, чем может закончиться история человечества. Но намёки эти пугают.

Лорен Грофф и её сборник коротких рассказов «Флорида» тоже достойны вашего внимания. Книга незаметно, исподволь затрагивает тему экологии, а мысль важности заботы об окружающей среде возникает только после прочтения подчас тяжёлых и беспокойных историй о змеях, штормах и детях.

Роман американской писательницы Барбары Кингсолвер «Настроение полёта» (Flight Behavior) заставляет читателя сопереживать истории о влиянии глобального потепления на бабочек-монархов. Хотя речь в книге, казалось бы, идёт про знакомые многим жизненные трудности в семье и в быту.

«Водяной нож» Паоло Бачигалупи показывает мир, в котором внезапные глобальные климатические изменения привели к тому, что водные ресурсы стали ходовым товаром. Дефицит воды заставляет некоторых политиков начать свои игры, деля сферы влияния. Сектанты набирают всё больший вес, а юная и очень бойкая журналистка ищет неприятности на особо мягкие места, пытаясь разобраться в системе водораспределения.

Схожая идея и у романа Эрика Брауна «Часовые Феникса». Природа нанесла человечеству ответный удар. На Земле стоит великая сушь. Немногие выжившие сражаются за источники воды. Небольшая команда отправляется в Африку в надежде найти такой источник. Будут ли их поиски удачными и чему научит дорога? Ответ вы найдёте в книге.

Раз речь зашла о дороге, хочу дополнительно упомянуть книгу, которая произвела на меня сильное впечатление. Она так и называется, «Дорога», автор — Кормак Маккарти. Это не совсем Cli-Fi, хотя экологическая катастрофа и сопутствующие ей проблемы присутствуют в полной мере. Отец с сыном идут к морю. Идут, чтобы выжить. Верить нельзя никому, слишком озлоблены оставшиеся в живых люди. Но остаётся луч надежды, что порядочность и честность по-прежнему живы. Надо только найти их. Получится ли?

Если вас интересует, как экологическая катастрофа может привести к классовыми и расовым вопросам, то можно прочесть книгу доминиканской писательницы Риты Индианы «Щупальца» (Tentacle). Не самый простой, и подчас навязчиво толерантный роман (если что, я вас предупредил) рассказывает о недалёком будущем, где молодая горничная оказалась в центре пророчества: только она может путешествовать во времени и спасти океан и человечество от катастрофы. Но сначала она должна стать человеком, которым она всегда была — с помощью священного анемона. Близок по духу книге и короткометражный фильм «Белый» Сайеды Кларк, в котором ради благополучного рождения своего ребёнка молодой человек жертвует… свой собственный цвет кожи.

«Шансы на завтра» (Odds Against Tomorrow) Натаниэля Рича описывают жизнь молодого специалиста, который погружается в математику катастроф. Он делает расчёты наихудшего развития событий экологических коллапсов, военных игр, стихийных бедствий. Его сценарии предельно точны и подробны, а потому задорого продаются корпорациям, так как позволяют защитить их от любых будущих бедствий. Однажды он узнаёт, что наихудший сценарий вот-вот настигнет Манхэттен. Молодой человек понимает, что он может разбогатеть на этом знании. Но какой ценой достанется ему это богатство?

Кима Стэнли Робинсона порой называют гением научной фантастики, помешанным на климатических изменениях. Его серия из трёх самостоятельных книг под названием «Столичная наука» объединена проблемой экологических катастроф и глобального потепления планеты. Действие разворачивается в недалёком будущем, когда глобальное потепление приводит к массированному таянию льдов и изменению течения Гольфстрима, что грозит наступлением нового Ледникового Периода. Некоторые люди борются за будущее человечества, однако немало есть и тех, кого даже на пороге гибели цивилизации волнуют лишь деньги и власть.

Автор рассказывает, как изменение поведения человеческого общества может стать решением климатического кризиса. Похожие мысли сквозят и в недавнем и наиболее популярном произведении Робинсона: «Нью-Йорк 2140». Люди здесь живут обычной жизнью, вот только в необычных условиях. Ведь из-за климатических изменений мегаполис почти полностью оказался под водой. Каждый небоскрёб стал островом, и люди живут на верхних этажах зданий. Год 2140 выбран неслучайно. Учёные прогнозируют, что в этот период уровень мирового океана поднимется настолько, что затопит многие города.

Уитли Стрибер (его тоже иногда называют помешанным, но по другой причине: он всерьёз уверяет, что его похищали пришельцы) в романе «Грядущая всемирная сверхбуря» показывает мир после всеобщего похолодания. Массовое таяние ледников приводит к тому, что температура Мирового океана не повышается, а наоборот, резко снижается. Климат на Земле начинает меняться. Погодные катаклизмы следуют один за другим, и выживать становится всё труднее. По мотивам этой книги, кстати, сняли фильм «Послезавтра».

Все книги, перечисленные выше, более-менее современные. Если же вам хочется более классической литературы, то рекомендую посмотреть в сторону британского писателя Джеймса Грэма Балларда и его романа «Ветер ниоткуда». Вполне себе Cli-Fi история о том как цивилизация гибнет из-за настойчивых ветров ураганной силы. Если понравится, есть и продолжение: романы «Затонувший мир», рассказывающий о таяние льдов на полюсах Земли и повышение уровня моря, а также «Сожжённый мир», где царит сюрреалистический засушливый ландшафт, который образовался из-за промышленного загрязнения, нарушающего цикл выпадения осадков.

Вполне вероятно, что вы тоже сталкивались с Cli-Fi-романами, которые показались вам интересными. Поделитесь в комментариях?
 
Автор рассказывает, как изменение поведения человеческого общества может стать решением климатического кризиса. Похожие мысли сквозят и в недавнем и наиболее популярном произведении Робинсона: «Нью-Йорк 2140». Люди здесь живут обычной жизнью, вот только в необычных условиях. Ведь из-за климатических изменений мегаполис почти полностью оказался под водой. Каждый небоскрёб стал островом, и люди живут на верхних этажах зданий. Год 2140 выбран неслучайно. Учёные прогнозируют, что в этот период уровень мирового океана поднимется настолько, что затопит многие города.

Уитли Стрибер (его тоже иногда называют помешанным, но по другой причине: он всерьёз уверяет, что его похищали пришельцы) в романе «Грядущая всемирная сверхбуря» показывает мир после всеобщего похолодания. Массовое таяние ледников приводит к тому, что температура Мирового океана не повышается, а наоборот, резко снижается. Климат на Земле начинает меняться. Погодные катаклизмы следуют один за другим, и выживать становится всё труднее. По мотивам этой книги, кстати, сняли фильм «Послезавтра».

Все книги, перечисленные выше, более-менее современные. Если же вам хочется более классической литературы, то рекомендую посмотреть в сторону британского писателя Джеймса Грэма Балларда и его романа «Ветер ниоткуда». Вполне себе Cli-Fi история о том как цивилизация гибнет из-за настойчивых ветров ураганной силы. Если понравится, есть и продолжение: романы «Затонувший мир», рассказывающий о таяние льдов на полюсах Земли и повышение уровня моря, а также «Сожжённый мир», где царит сюрреалистический засушливый ландшафт, который образовался из-за промышленного загрязнения, нарушающего цикл выпадения осадков.

Вполне вероятно, что вы тоже сталкивались с Cli-Fi-романами, которые показались вам интересными. Поделитесь в комментариях?

SOME EARLY cli-fi novels noted in a 2010 letter to editor in UK newspaper headlined "SF writers hvae had climate change covered for decades''

SOME EARLY Cli-Fi Novels noted in 2010 letter to editor in a UK newspaper
 Opinion Page

        Letter to the Editor of the FT in the UK in 2010, long ago!
    
 
   
 
   HEADLINE OF LETTER:
Science fiction writers have had climate change covered for decades
 
  July 10, 2010
  
  
   
  
 

 
   From Mr Bob Buhr the UK

Dear Sir, I just caught up with Ed Crooks’ review of climate change in fiction (“ When the wind blows”, Life & Arts, June 26-27), and, once again, we can see that science fiction writers have been writing about climate change for the past couple of decades.



Ian McEwan is certainly wrong when he says it’s hard to find novels about climate change.

He should just wander over to a different section of the bookstore. Even leaving aside most of the post-apocalyptic novels premised on some sort of global warming catastrophe, the following are pretty good examples of what the genre has been producing.

First, let's mention JG Ballard in your review. The Drowned World (1962) is a classic.

Kim Stanley Robinson’s Forty Signs of Rain (2005), Fifty Degrees Below (2007) and Sixty Days and Counting (2007) are an engaging and all too plausible chronicle of near-term events. All are more plausible and entertaining than McEwan’s Saturday. It’s actually on the basis of Saturday – a genuinely bad book by an otherwise good writer – that I’m holding off on his cli-fi novel titled ''Solar.''

Bruce Sterling’s Heavy Weather (1995) is as scary as hell. Take the notion of tornado hunters and translate into an extreme weather nightmare.

In Jonathan Barnes’ Mother of Storms (1995) methane clouds from under the Arctic disrupt global weather catastrophically when released by a nuclear explosion.

And since Mr Crooks is the energy editor, he could then think about the large methane bubble lying underneath the Gulf of Mexico oil spill and what that might accomplish if released.

Then there is Nothing Human (2003) by Nancy Kress, with global warming and its impacts as the backdrop for some changes to humanity. An astonishingly good book on any number of levels, not least in its description of a US dissolving from the impact of warming.

Peter F. Hamilton’s Mindstar Rising (1993) is set in England in the early 21st century as it tries to recover from global warming.

Meanwhile, the title of Arthur Herzog’s Heat (1976) sums it up. Herzog was talking about CO2 and global warming decades ago.

Paolo Bacigalupi wrote a number of short stories about climate change impacts, collected in Pump Six (2008).

Finally, Philip K. Dick wrote several novels in which the background environment is one ravaged by global warming. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is the best known, as the basis for the film Blade Runner.

Happy reading!

Bob Buhr,London NW3, UK

기후변화의 재앙을 그리는 '클라이 파이', 주류 장르가 되다 / 미국 작가이자 클라이 파이 애호가인 댄 블룸(Dan Bloom)은 "클라이 파이가 들불처럼 퍼지고 있다"고 짚었다.

미국 작가이자 클라이 파이 애호가인 댄 블룸(Dan Bloom)
 "클라이 파이가 들불처럼 퍼지고 있다"고 짚었다.

  • 아시아타임즈코리아
  • 승인 2019.11.18 in SOUTH KOREA
  • 댓글 0




이달 호주에서 발생한 들불은 재난 영화와 꼭 닮았다 (사진: AFP)
이달 호주에서 발생한 들불은 재난 영화와 꼭 닮았다 (사진: AFP)


폭풍우로 인해 거대한 해안 도시가 물에 잠기고 모든 생물이 멸종 위기에 빠지고 천연자원을 두고 분쟁이 벌어지는 세상을 상상해보라.

2019년 현재 그것은 크게 어려운 일이 아닐지 모른다.

기상이변과 기후변화에 대한 불안이 점점 커지면서 공상 과학의 영역에 속하던 기후변화라는 주제가 문학이나 영화의 주류 장르로 자리 잡고 있다.

전 세계적인 기후 재난을 그린 2004년 롤랜드 에머리히 감독의 영화 '투모로우(The Day After Tomorrow)'가 대표적이다.

기후변화로 인해 슈퍼 태풍, 홍수, 산불, 가뭄 등이 잦아지면서 이 새로운 장르, 이른바 '클라이 파이(cli-fi)'는 인기는 점점 높아지고 있다. 클라이 파이는 '기후'라는 의미의 'Climate'과 '허구'이라는 의미의 'Fiction'의 합성어로 '기후 소설'이라고 해석되기도 한다.

미국 작가이자 클라이 파이 애호가인 댄 블룸(Dan Bloom)은 "클라이 파이가 들불처럼 퍼지고 있다"고 짚었다.

그는 이 장르의 인기에 기여한 건 파리기후변화협약에서 일방적으로 탈퇴한 도널드 트럼프 미국 대통령이라고 말한다.

그는 "기후변화가 현실이 아니라고 말하는 사람들이 많다"며 "이들은 우리를 화나게 하고 결과적으로 클라이 파이는 점점 더 세를 불리고 있다"고 지적했다.

일례로 프랑스에서는 상상 가능한 디스토피아적 미래를 그린 두 가지 TV 드라마가 대중의 인기와 비평가의 찬사를 동시에 받고 있다.

그 중 하나인 '마지막 파도(가제·The Last Wave)'는 기상악화로 실종된 10명의 서퍼 이야기를 담았다. 그들이 돌아왔을 때 그들은 겪은 일을 기억하지 못하지만 낯선 힘을 얻게 된다.

또 이번 주에는 연료가 부족하고 핵시설이 위협 받는 묵시록적 세계를 그린 '붕괴(가제·The Collapse)'가 방영을 시작했다.

호주 멜버른 소재 모나쉬대학의 앤드류 밀너 비교문학 교수는 클라이 파이가 아직 공상 과학 영역에서 완전히 벗어나지 못했지만 최근 수년 동안 성장이 두드러지고 있다고 진단했다.

여기에는 기후변화에 저항하는 국제적 운동이 확산하면서 기부 변화에 대한 대중의 인식이 높아진 게 주효했다.

'과학소설과 기후변화: 사회학적 접근법(Science Fiction and Climate Change: A Sociological Approach)'의 공동 저자 JR 부르크만은 "클라이 파이의 인기는 실제 사회가 가진 우려를 반영하는 것"이라면서 "나는 문학이 인간에 의한 기후 변화에 느리게 반응하고 있다고 주장해 왔지만 이제는 문학이 그 잃어버린 시간을 따라잡으려는 것 같아 보인다"고 분석했다. 

물론 기후변화에 관한 작품은 어제오늘의 얘기가 아니다.

작가 J. G. 밸러드(J. G. Ballard)의 1964년 작품 '불타버린 세계(The Burning World)는 환경 파괴로 쑥대밭이 된 세계를 묘사했다.

존 스타인벡(John Steinbeck)의 1939년 소설 '분노의 포도(The Grapes of Wrath)'는 오클라호마의 모래먼지를 피하려는 기후 이민자들의 시련을 다룬다.

인기 클라이 파이 작가인 장 마르크 라니(Jean-Marc Ligny)는 기후변화에 대한 높아진 대중의 인식과 끊임없는 가뭄, 산불, 폭염 등의 재난이 기후변화를 "무시하기 어려운" 하나의 주제로 만들고 있다고 봤다.

그는 "기후변화는 스토리가 필요하고 독자들은 이 얘기를 들을 필요가 있다"며 "수치과 통계가 있지만 이것은 실제로 아무런 얘기도 들려주지 않는다. 클라이 파이를 통해 사람들은 상황을 더 잘 이해하게 된다"고 강조했다. (AFP)